Container Specs

Standard Container Specs by Size

Shipping containers are made from corrugated weathering steel, commonly known as COR-TEN Steel (trademark of US Steel Corporation). Floors are made from 1-1/8” thick marine grade plywood.

20′ Standard
External Dimensions:

  • Length: 20′
  • Width: 8′
  • Height: 8’6″

Interior Dimensions:

  • Length: 19’4″
  • Width: 7’8″
  • Height: 7’9″

Door Clearance:

  • Width: 7’8″
  • Height: 7’5″

Weight: 5,200 – 5,500 lbs.

40′ Standard
External Dimensions:

  • Length: 40′
  • Width: 8′
  • Height: 8’6″

Interior Dimensions:

  • Length: 39’4″
  • Width: 7’8″
  • Height: 7’9″

Door Clearance:

  • Width: 7’8″
  • Height: 7’5″

Weight: 8,380 – 8,450 lbs.

40′ High Cube
External Dimensions:

  • Length: 40′
  • Width: 8′
  • Height: 9’6″

Interior Dimensions:

  • Length: 39’4″
  • Width: 7’8″
  • Height: 8’9″

Door Clearance:

  • Width: 7’8″
  • Height: 8’5″

Weight: 8,600 – 8,800 lbs.

45′ High Cube
External Dimensions:

  • Length: 45′
  • Width: 8′
  • Height: 9’6″

Interior Dimensions:

  • Length: 344’4″
  • Width: 7’8″
  • Height: 8’9″

Door Clearance:

  • Width: 7’8″
  • Height: 8’5″

Weight: 10,580 – 11,000 lbs.

Container Grading

The basic structural conditions used in the shipping industry are:

  • IICL5: This is the international leasing inspection/repair standard, generally regarded as the most stringent.
  • CW (Cargo Worthy): This is the standard used by most shipping lines.
  • WWT (Wind and Watertight): This is a common standard used by container traders to classify containers that do not have a valid CSC Plate for shipping. Although watertight, these containers are not suitable for shipping for any number of inspection criteria.
  • AI (As is): This grade classifies containers that have no guarantee that they are, or will remain watertight or cargo worthy for any extended period of time. Often they have sustained damage that is not easily repaired such as large dents, holes or extensive, deep-seated corrosion.

The basic aesthetic conditions are used to describe the cleanliness and visual state of the container are:

  • Food Grade: Used to classify the highest standard of internal cleanliness.
  • Furniture Quality: Generally a very clean container that won’t transfer marks to cargo.
  • General Quality: Scuffed and marked with some rust showing.
  • Industrial Quality: Quite badly marked with widespread rust showing.

Deliveries

Rollback (Standard Tow Truck): A more compact setup used to haul 20’ containers. Easier to maneuver, less likely to get stuck on wet or softer surfaces, better for tightly spaced drop-offs.
 
Tractor & Trailer (Landoll Type): A more heavy duty setup. Can haul (2) 20’s / 40’ / 40’HC / 45’HC. More likely to spin tires or get stuck in off-road conditions. Drivers generally avoid pronounced inclines and declines, soft and/or wet surfaces and tight spaces. Generally, this setup requires approximately 120’ of space to make a safe drop-off without obstructions preventing maneuverability from side to side.
 
Chassis: This is your standard setup for intermodal use. Intermodal is a term used in the shipping industry that describes the containers as having the ability to be transported by different modes. For example, ship to rail to truck (chassis). Generally, this setup is used in the transportation of goods. The chassis and container are dock height for loading and off-loading freight. This setup also requires some type of forklift to remove the container either at the port, depot, or customer’s location. If a customer has the ability to offload the container from a chassis setup this will most likely be the most economical way to deliver the unit.